Controversies about Drug Rehabilitation Facilities – Tuesday, 2.2.2010

Posted on 3 February 2010. Filed under: Week 650 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Mirror, Vol. 14, No. 650

Note:

Apologies, for technical reasons we do not have a translated article from the Khmer press today.

We bring, however, references to a hotly contested issue from these days.

Norbert Klein

Humanitarian News and Analysis, a project of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, recently carried a report from Phnom Penh dated 29 January 2010, quoting that a climate of “sadistic violence” exists in government-run drug rehabilitation centers in Cambodia.

“It works on the wrong assumption that what helps people with drug dependency problems is being tough, using hard work and discipline. But there’s no quick fix.” Mr. Graham Shaw, a World Health Organization (WHO) technical officer based in Cambodia, says that persons in charge of running such drug centers openly admitted some time ago that they did not have the skills to conduct proper drug assistance.

However, operators of drug rehabilitation centers denied the accusations that patients are held against their will and subjected to “sadistic violence” such as torture, rape, and humiliations. Mr. Nean Sokhim, the director of the My Chance Drug Detention and Rehabilitation Center, Phnom Penh, is the director of the civilian-run My Chance drug rehabilitation center in Phnom Penh. In a report, he says patients are treated well, receive three meals a day, and have job training opportunities, and nobody is forced to be in his center. But then:

  • Interviewer: So if someone tries to run away you give them drugs so they can’t escape?
  • Nean Sokhim: Yeah, yeah yeah.

The World Health Organization did an assessment and they said in their report that they estimated that it was close to 100 percent relapse for the people who have been in these centers.. “It’s just the wrong way to approach drug addiction. Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing condition. It’s not helped by a period of military drills and forced exercise.”

Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
Tuesday, 2 February 2010

Deum Ampil, Vol.4, #403, 2.2.2010

  • Human Rights Watch Asked for the Closure of 11 Rehabilitation Centers of Drug Addicts in Cambodia [claiming that there is mistreatment against them]
  • The Prime Minister Suggested to Ministers to Reduce Their Visits Abroad [to save national resources]

Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.9, #2166, 2.2.2010

    • Police Suppressed Gamble Site of Chae Muoy [colloquial for Chinese “sister”], Holding Nine Gamblers for a While and Then Releasing Them [Chamkar Mon, Phnom Penh]
    • Anonymous Persons Threw Many Plastic Bags Containing Feces into [Thai Prime Minister] Abhisit Vijjajiva’s Home [Thailand]

    Khmer Machas Srok, Vol.4, #595, 2.2.2010

    • The Fact that Illegal Logging Still Occurs Is a Sign That Traders and Cooperating Officials Convey to Mr. Hun Sen, Telling Him that They Do Not Follow the Prime Minister’s Order [towards military officials to stop being involved in illegal activities]

    Koh Santepheap, Vol.43, #6873, 2.2.2010

    • A Swedish Delegation [led by Mr. Jan Knutsson, the Director General for International Development Cooperation of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Sweden] Comes to Study the Reform Processes in Cambodia [such as the fight against corruption, the improvement of public services, the increase of salaries, and the strengthening of the capacity of civil servants]

    Phnom Penh Post [Khmer Edition], Vol.1, #102, 2.2.2010

    • The Prime Minister Called on the Citizens Not to Create Religious Conflicts [he said so during a Buddhist ceremony in Kandal]

    Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.18, #5115, 2.2.2010

    • Members of the Sam Rainsy Party Met Their Party President via Video Conference [while he is in France; he was sentenced in absentia to serve two years in prison for removing temporary Cambodian-Vietnamese border markers]
      Four People Died after a Truck Crashed into Their Motorbike from Behind [four of them rode on one motorbike; the driver of the truck escaped – Kompong Speu]

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  • First Senior Citizens’ Association Created in Phnom Penh – Thursday, 28.1.2010

    Posted on 29 January 2010. Filed under: Week 649 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The Mirror, Vol. 14, No. 649

    “In the morning of 27 January 2010, there was an announcement about the creation of the first senior citizens’ association in Phnom Penh. A permanent deputy director and the director of the Department of Social Affairs, Mr. Son Sophal, the Chamkar Mon district governor, Mr. Lo Yuy, and other fellow officials attended the ceremony. The establishment of the Senior Citizens’ Association by the Department of Social Affairs, Veterans, and Youth Rehabilitation in Phsar Daeum Thkov commune suggests that the 8 districts and 76 communes in Phnom Penh should consider establishing senior citizens’ associations, because elderly people have very little opportunity to seek income as they are weak, especially elderly women .

    “The director of the Phnom Penh Department of Social Affairs, Mr. Son Sophal, said that among the population [of about 14 million], elderly people 60 years and above, increased from 4.4% in 2000 to 6% in 2004, with a total number of about 852,000. For 2025, it is forecast that the number will double to as many as 1.5 million. He went on to say that at present there are more than 30,000 people who are retired civil servants, and more than 5,000 people are disabled and jobless and are receiving financial support from the government. He emphasized that the creation of the first Senior Citizens’ Association in Phsar Daeum Thkov commune is a model for the 8 districts and 76 communes to follow.

    “The Chamkar Mon district governor, Mr. Lo Yuy, who also attended the event, asked all grandfathers and grandmothers [= all elderly people] from the age of 55 and above to consider becoming members of the Senior Citizens’ Association, because it will provide them with benefits and promote their dignity. He added that he will encourage elderly people to help each other, especially when facing difficulties that can harm their lives. Also, the Phnom Penh municipal governor, Mr. Kep Chuktema, donated Riel 2 million [approx. US$500] to support this newly created association.

    “Besides the donation of Riel 2 million, he granted one Sarong [a traditional piece of cloth] to the 145 elderly people who attended the founding ceremony. It should be noted that the Senior Citizens’ Association that has just been established has 11 members: 1 director, 1 deputy director, and 9 members.” Areyathor, Vol.16, #1429, 28-29.1.2010

    Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
    Thursday, 28 January 2010

    Areyathor, Vol.16, #1429, 28-29.1.2010

    • First Senior Citizens’ Association Created in Phnom Penh

    Deum Ampil, Vol.4, #399, 28.1.2010

    Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.9, #2162, 28.1.2010

    • Car Sellers from 10 Local Companies Asked for the Intervention from Samdech Hun Sen [as they are no longer allowed to import Toyota cars, and only one company, TTHK, has an exclusive contract to import Toyota cars, reducing the profit of other companies significantly]
    • Samdech Hun Sen: The Minister of Public Works and Transport [Mr. Tram Iv Tek] Is a Minister Not Showing Respect [as he changed the number of a road without an approval from the Prime Minister, who therefore called him a “gang minister” behaving like a gangster, acting recklessly, according to the Phnom Penh Post]

    Khmer Machas Srok, Vol.4, #591, 28.1.2010

    • [Sam Rainsy Party spokesperson] Mr. Yim Sovann: The Sam Rainsy Party Opposes the Government Plan to Increase Electricity Prices

    Koh Santepheap, Vol.43, #6869, 28.1.2010

    • Some Foreign Requests Are Rejected: Cambodia Will Absolutely Not Send Deminers to Afghanistan and Iraq [as it is dangerous for Cambodian deminers, said Prime Minister Hun Sen]
    • The Committee for Free and Fair Elections Released Research Findings Showing that only 10% of the Eligible Citizens Know the Parliamentarians Who Represent Them [this research was conducted with 8,678 Cambodian people responding]

    Phnom Penh Post [Khmer Edition], Vol.1, #99, 28.1.2010

    • Citizens Called on Government Officials to Intervene to Release Six Village Chiefs Who Were Detained because They Protected Their Village Land [of 60 hectares from being grabbed by a Chinese company; Phnom Sruoch, Kompong Speu]
    • The National Information Communications Technology Development Authority (NiDA) Announced to Hold the Sixth Information Technology Exhibition on 1 to 3 April 2010 [in Phnom Penh]

    Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.18, #5111, 28.1.2010

    • Intensive Wood Trading Continues at the [Cambodian-Thai] Border while the Border Disputes Remain Unsolved

    Sereypheap Thmey, Vol.18, #1865, 28.1.2010

    • Mr. Sam Rainsy Was Convicted to be Jailed for Two Years [in absentia] and Each [of two] Citizens Was Jailed One Year, and They Were Ordered to Pay Riel 50 Million [approx. US$12,500] in Fines to the Border Committee [for removing temporary Cambodian-Vietnamese border markers – in a closed-door session of the Svay Rieng court]

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    A 30 Years Commemoration – Civil Society in Cambodia – Sunday, 29.11.2009

    Posted on 30 November 2009. Filed under: *Editorial*, Week 640 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The Mirror, Vol. 13, No. 640

    The past weak saw a special anniversary celebration, which is in no calendar of national events: 30 years since NGOs started to work in Cambodia. Nowadays, when the participation of NGOs – foreign and national – is assumed as a regular feature of life in society, it is surely not easy to understand the extraordinary nature that foreign NGOs came to Cambodia in 1979. At that time, the majority of UN member states considered the Cambodian government to be illegal. The so called “Western” countries and the People’s Republic of China agreed on the point that the Khmer Rouge representative continued to legally represent Cambodia at the United Nations until 1990. Seeing this agreement between these two world powers normally not much in agreement, many Third World countries went along with this understanding. Only the socialist countries (except China) and India established diplomatic relations with the government in Phnom Penh after the end of the Khmer Rouge regime. And US citizens, working in Cambodia, even if their salaries did not originate from the USA, had to pay “punitive taxes” in the USA.

    30 Years NGOs in Cambodia Celebration

    30 Years NGOs in Cambodia Celebration

    Eva Mysliwiec, now the director of Youth Star Cambodia, who had came to Cambodia in May 1980, spoke at the commemoration, on behalf of the NGO Organizing Committee, about the three decades of NGO partnerships with the people and government of Cambodia, saying,

    “It is very moving to look around this room and to see so many people who have contributed to the Cambodia in which we live today. How far we have come since 1979!

    I remember well my arrival in May 1980, in a country devastated by war and genocide. I remember vividly my first meeting with Samdech HUN Sen who was then Foreign Minister and 28 years old.”

    There were only five NGOs, who had dared to break the boycot of their home governments: the American Friends Service Committee, CIDSE, Church World Service, OXFAM, and World Vision – now, as the Prime Minister announced in his speech, there are 3,207 NGOs and associations, that is 1,933 NGOs and 1,274 other associations. Eva Mysliwiec continued:

    “The core of NGO work was focused on massive relief, meeting health needs and restoring agricultural production in order to prevent famine. Because of the embargo imposed by the Western Community and with precious few resources, NGOs found themselves in a unique role where they had to provide massive infrastructure assistance as well… NGO work in the eighties spanned virtually every sector of Cambodian society and economy, from the restoration of urban and rural water supply, to the rehabilitation of infrastructure, the provision of basic agriculture, education and health inputs, etc. – the list is endless.”

    But in spite of all this emphasis on practical actions, she said:

    “In my view, the most valuable role the NGOs played in the eighties was solidarity: bearing
    witness to the suffering of Cambodian people, bearing witness to the unearthing of mass graves, bearing witness to the continuing hardship caused by the embargo and isolation and especially bearing witness to the resilience, ingenuity and determination of people to rebuild their country. They created a bridge between Cambodian people and the people in countries whose governments did not recognize Cambodia.”

    This history has to be remembered, when nowadays, sometimes the opinion is expressed that NGOs have one role only: “to provide humanitarian assistance” – quite different from the wide variety of activities NGOs are engaged with in other countries of the world.

    All the more it was interesting that also the keynote speaker, Ingrid Srinath, Secretary General of CIVICUS (“Promoting a worldwide community of informed, inspired, committed citizens who are actively engaged in confronting the challenges facing humanity” – with member organizations in 110 countries), described the fundamental task of civil society not just in terms of development or humanitarian project implementations, but located their role in the present situation, after the collapse of many schemes based on an free-market system, where human rights an democratic are more under threat than before.

    “In Latin America, Africa, Eurasia and Asia authoritarian governments are being permitted to crack down with impunity on civil society and media freedoms through new, draconian legislative and fiscal controls if they control access to energy resources, investment or markets… Funding for defending these rights, for strengthening civil society architecture and for building solidarity across civil society groups is also much harder to come by as donor resources are stretched by increasing domestic needs and by more immediate humanitarian needs…

    “The possibilities of mounting a coherent challenge to the economic paradigm of market fundamentalism and the patent inequity of the institutions of global governance have never been greater. For the first time in history peoples from Michigan to Manila, Madrid to Mali, and Mumbai to Moscow can share the realization that the root causes of their individual problems, and hence their interests, are in fact, identical. From slums to forests, fishing communities to assembly-lines, indigenous peoples to suburbia – the people we so often refer to as ‘ordinary’ are increasingly aware of the connectedness of their causes. It’s up to us as civil society to provide the means for them to mobilize in solidarity with each other. We have unprecedented access to the information, networks and technologies that permit us to support their struggles against tyranny and injustice…

    “Speaking in Moscow a few months ago, Barack Obama affirmed that ‘meeting these challenges requires a vibrant civil society; the freedom of people to live as they choose, to speak their minds, to organize peacefully and to have a say in how they are governed; a free press to report the truth; confidence in the rule of law and the equal administration of justice; a government that’s accountable and transparent.’

    “We know from experience that active citizenship is the only antidote to this takeover of governance and that investing in the creation, nurturing and protection of civil society rights is the only vaccine. We know, or ought to, that empowering people to defend their own freedoms to exist, engage and express is not only the most sustainable development strategy but the only morally defensible one…

    “Despite, or rather because of, our lack of hierarchical command and control structures, our diversity and belief in values-led approaches, civil society is better equipped to grasp, respond to, and evolve collective solutions that require a fundamental shift in world-view than either governments or businesses. And possibly better at displaying the humility required to build the cross-sectoral partnerships without which we cannot possibly resolve these crises…

    “Doing so will take more than a business as usual approach from us. It will take each of us as individuals, organizations and alliances setting aside our egos, our brands, our narrow self-interests and our differences to come together in unprecedented levels of collaboration and genuine partnership that focuses on amplifying the voices of those least heard, and of finding common cause across boundaries of nationality, geography and thematic interest.

    “If we can aspire to that ideal, we may, just may, address the stupendous challenges before us and even realize the goals you have all dedicated your lives to, whether you approach that goal through the lens of volunteerism or human rights, faith or secularism, charity or human rights – the overarching goal of civil society in all its forms – a world based on equity and justice.”

    Such a challenge to reflect, to consider a clear fundamental orientation for the day-to-day work of civil society is important. And it is equally important that civil society communicates clearly to the other sectors of society its claims and commitments. It is important to see what the suggested orientation is: “to struggle against tyranny and injustice, and for equality.”

    The address of the Prime Minister dealt, according to reports, a lot with the planned NGO Law. There is some apprehension among the NGO community, because a current draft is not available for public discussion in the community.

    Some examples given, why an NGO Law is important – like to prevent terrorist acts planned under the cover of NGOs – were widely not seen as convincing: the intended terrorist attack against the British Embassy had been stopped in time, and the Indonesian terrorist Hambali was arrested – both without an NGO law.

    The following reported concern of the Prime Minister is surprising. There are detailed and elaborate forms from the Council for the Development of Cambodia – CDC – where NGOs have to describe source of funding and work plans – on the national level and in the provinces – which serve exactly this purpose since many years ago, though the Prime Minister said now:

    “The Royal Government wants to know where NGOs get the money from and how they use it for what. ‘Just this they do not want to tell.’”

    Here are obviously some misunderstandings about administrative processes involved. In addition, most donors, providing financial resources to NGO, have requirements for professional auditing, and the results are not secret. Compared to the recent calls by the Prime Minister to curb multiple remuneration payments to government advisers, combined with the repeated calls by the Prime Minister to economize gasoline usage by a better control on the use of public vehicles, allows the assumption that the handling of finance in the NGO world is comparatively well organized and transparent.

    What is important, therefore, is the clear statement of the Prime Minister, that the NGO Law will not interfere with the normal activities of NGO: “I guarantee that it is not an action to restrict the freedom of NGOs, please believe me.” Should lower level authorities try to act differently, civil society can appeal to this public promise of the Prime Minister.

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    Cambodia Has No Insurance for the Durability of Buildings – Saturday, 17.10.2009

    Posted on 18 October 2009. Filed under: Week 634 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    The Mirror, Vol. 13, No. 634

    “Phnom Penh: People are always excited when they travel along roads with new buildings and construction sites, but senior staff of insurance companies in Cambodia claimed that by now, there is still no insurance for building durability in Cambodia.

    “In Phnom Penh, many high rise buildings are being constructed nowadays, especially along the Monivong Boulevard. Representatives of insurance companies in Cambodia said that Cambodia has no law requiring high rise building to pay for building durability insurance.

    “A manager of an insurance company who asked not to be named said that so far, in Cambodia there is no law requiring to contract building durability insurance for high rise buildings. That is why construction quality is still a challenging issue, and clients have just to trust.

    “He added, ‘So far, Cambodian law requires only to have third party liability insurance during the period of the construction, but there is still a gap to achieve insurance for building durability.’

    “He went on to say that in other countries, almost all construction activity includes to contract durability insurance for buildings. Therefore, the quality of construction in those countries is guaranteed, and the durability of buildings can be predicted, while in Cambodia, there is no such thing.

    “The director of the Caminco Insurance company, Mr. Duong Vibol, said on 15 October 2009 that also his insurance company offers insurance services related to the construction of buildings, but the agents of the company have not been able to attract clients constructing big and high rise buildings.

    “He said, ‘I do not know what the requirements of the laws are, but we have assigned agents to talk to them, but so far, there is no response – or they said that they had already bought insurance from abroad.’

    “Also the director of the Forte Insurance company, Mr. Yak Chamroenrith, said on the same day that most high rise buildings being constructed along the Monivong Boulevard belong to clients of his company, but they contracted only third party liability insurance, but there is no insurance yet for the durability of the buildings. He said, ‘In modern countries, there is such a service, but in Cambodia, there is none.’

    “According to Mr. Chamroenrith, the third party liability insurance is a service that guarantees payments only for accidents that might happen during the construction, but it does not guarantee the quality or the durability of buildings.’

    “He continued to say that for the insurance of building durability, many studies have to be made and conditions have to be fulfilled.

    “While local insurance companies claimed that high rise buildings being constructed do not have insurance for the durability of the building, they said that those big constructions companies might have insurance service contracts with companies abroad.

    “Mr. Chamroenrith added that in general, the construction of such high rise building is not conducted without proper thinking about the quality. Most conditions have to be met to have insurance, even during the stage of the construction. But what he is concerned about is the quality of buildings constructed by private developers.

    “Though those high rise buildings may already have insurance, the above mentioned anonymous person suggested that the construction companies should pay for insurance from local companies.

    “He added, ‘The construction is conducted in Cambodia, while the insurance is bought from foreign countries. This can be risky.’

    “He went on to say that to promote the local insurance sector, all construction companies should contract such services from local insurance companies.” Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.17, #5023, 17.10.2009

    .

    Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
    Saturday, 17 October 2009

    Deum Ampil, Vol.3, #313, 17.10.2009

    • The Chinese Prime Minister Promised to Jointly Address the Economic Crisis, Cooperating with Cambodia
    • Husband and Wife, Both Teachers, Detained Girls for Torture [they were arrested – Phnom Penh]

    Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.8, #2074, 17.10.2009

    • [The president of the National Assembly] Samdech Heng Samrin Will Lead a Senior Delegation of the National Assembly to Russia in Early November 2009
    • The [Vietnamese] Branch Director of Cambodia Angkor Air Was Chased and Shot by [two] Gunmen in Front of His House [fortunately, he was not hit; the perpetrators escaped – Phnom Penh]

    Khmer Machas Srok, Vol.3, #511, 17.10.2009

    • Civil Society [the Cambodian Defenders’ Project] Wants to See that the Government Publishes the Contents of Law as Broadly as It Does at the National Assembly [after laws have been adopted and published in the Official Gazette which is not broadly distributed, the citizens and the law enforcement agents who have to implement the law need to be informed to avoid any wrong implementation of the law]

    Note:

    A description of related considerations can be found in the following article published on 30 January 2006 by the Journal of Information, Law and Technology:

    Access to Legal Information in Cambodia: Initial Steps, Future Possibilities

    Though Article 13 of the Law on the Organization and Functioning of the Council of Ministers (1994) provides that “all norms and standards with general effect must be published in the Official Gazette,” the publication of Cambodian laws is intermittent, incomplete and poorly distributed. This problem is compounded by the fact that the 1993 Constitution expressly saves laws which were made under previous regimes, arguably including laws from the pre-Khmer Rouge period. For these reasons there is no definitive collection of Cambodian laws currently in force…

    Next Steps

    On the basis of the Cambodian specific experience … there is an argument that the publication and distribution of law in electronic form is an appropriate tool to address the question of access to information in a legal system which has operated without adequate access to even the most basic legal information.

    Though there are issues to consider with regard to the development of a legal information system which will work in the Cambodian context, the country would appear to be at a juncture whereby there is sufficient political will to commence a dialogue with government, academia and civil society with a view to developing a model for the sustainable provision of legal information via the internet. Ideally, any movements in this direction would be accompanied by a regulation requiring all institutions of state to provide certain identified classes of documents for free electronic distribution…

    Thus in Cambodia, as elsewhere in the world, we should anticipate that the development of the rule of law will be dependent not only on information sharing, but on the establishment of networks of people who are determined to use that information to promote a legal system which is independent, predicable and just.

    Koh Santepheap, Vol.42, #6781, 17-18.10.2009

    • The Ministry of Interior Announced Results: 8,500 Gangsters Were Intercepted [from 13 July to 13 October 2009 – arrests, some sent to the courts, some handed over to their parents or to social or rehabilitation centers]; Traffic Accidents in 2008 Wasted US$308 Million
    • In 2010 Khmer and Thai People Can Cross the Border without Applying for Visas [according to ASEAN and bilateral agreements]
    • The Cuban Ambassador to Cambodia Announced that the Cuban Government Demands that the United States of America Withdraw Their Economic [commercial, financial, and taxation] Sanction [against Cuba]

    Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.17, #5023, 17.10.2009

    • Cambodia Has No Insurance for the Durability of Buildings
    • [The Chinese Prime Minister] Mr. Wen Jiabao [温家宝 – Pinyin: Wēn Jiābǎo] Told Samdech Euv [former King] that China Will Continue Its Cooperation with Cambodia
    • Typhoon Ketsana Killed 35 People and Destroyed Property Worth Approximately US$41 Million [according to the assessment of the National Committee for Disaster Management
    • Court Released Four Chinese Men on Bail [they assaulted and injured two police seriously in Kampot]

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    Monday, 9.6.2008: Memorandum of Understanding between UNODC and the Ministry of Health on Drug Issues Follow-Up

    Posted on 10 June 2008. Filed under: Week 564 | Tags: , , , , , , |

    The Mirror, Vol. 12, No. 564

    Development of Community-Based Drug Abuse Counseling, Treatment and Rehabilitation Services in Cambodia

    “Phnom Penh: The workshop based on the Memorandum of Understanding between the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime [UNODC] in the Asia Pacific region and the Ministry of Health on Development of Community-Based Drug Abuse, Counseling, Treatment and Rehabilitation Services in Cambodia for five cities and provinces seriously affected by drug use is very important. This was stated by Lieutenant-General Lour Ramin, the secretary-general of the National Authority for Combating Drugs, during the workshop at the Cambodiana Hotel on the morning of 6 June 2008.

    “The secretary-general added that the Project TD/CMB/04/H83 “Development of Community-Based Drug Abuse Counseling, Treatment and Rehabilitation Services in Cambodia” [as part of the Asia & Pacific Amphetamine-Type Stimulants Information Center] had been implemented in the 2005 to 2010 national planning of the National Authority for Combating Drugs. The H83 project agreement had been signed by Deputy Prime Minister Sar Kheng, head of the National Authority for Combating Drugs, and UNODC, and its implementation is administered and monitored by the general-secretariat of the National Authority for Combating Drugs. This project has started to create groups engaged in counseling, treatment and rehabilitation services, and the members of these groups come from government institutions and non-government organizations that support these polices and anti-drug programs, including concerns for health, HIV, AIDS, education, social affairs, human rights, justice, and good governance. Based on the results of the survey on drug addicts in 60 communes of twelve cities and towns badly affected by drugs, there is hope that state institutions and non-government organizations, that have the ability and have the necessary human resources, will initiate community based counseling, treatment, and rehabilitation services for drug addicts. At the same time while the program is implemented in selected places, there will also be training about treatment and rehabilitation services, and methods to protect persons who get easily involved in drug use.

    “At the workshop following from the Memorandum of Understanding of 29 May 2008, members from twelve cities and provinces which are seriously affected by drugs, formulated the following recommendations: 1. Publish the results of the surveys in the cities and provinces. 2. Evaluate the needs for training and for the strengthening of the capacities on the provincial and city levels, in order to intervene at the communities. 3. Plan training and strengthen capacities based on the evaluation of the needs. 4. Link health centers, referral hospitals, and drug addicts’ treating centers to reduce the need for many drug related actions on the commune level; and 5. Collect and organize documents providing multi-sector solutions for counseling and community based treatment for drug addicts, which include drug addicts’ treating centers at the localities of the rehabilitation services, including education, preventive education, creation of supporting groups, the control of problems etc.

    “Lieutenant-General Lour Ramin pointed out that documents of the project, signed by Deputy Prime Minister Sar Kheng, president of the National Authority for Combating Drugs, on behalf of the Royal Government of the Kingdom of Cambodia, agreed to the following points:

    The funds will be managed on an annual basis by the Ministry of Health for expenses of salaries and of other expenses related to medicines for the centers selected, and for centers created by the royal government countrywide in the future.

    Staff of the Ministry of Health will continue to train different skills such as psychology to doctors and medics through the International Organization for Migration [IOM] and other relevant programs.
    Asia & Pacific Amphetamine-Type Stimulants Information Center]

    Continue training of different skills for staff of the Ministry of Social Affairs, Veterans and Youth Rehabilitation, regarding rehabilitation and other relevant programs. Be prepared to accept new good methods when projects finish, and include new methods to the learning programs of the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Social Affairs, Veterans and Youth Rehabilitation.
    Train law enforcement officials to use drug control laws which consider the situation of drug users who are victims, and allow those who voluntarily receive treatment, to have the right to get treatment. Create more centers for counseling on treatment and on rehabilitation at cities and provinces, such as Sihanoukville, Siem Reap, and Kompong Cham.

    “This program provides very important solutions to reduce drug use in Cambodia, and it is expected to be highly efficient for the rehabilitation of drug addicts in different localities, with the involvement of the National Authority for Combating Drugs to fight drugs as well as the Royal Government, to prevent drug use and to reduce different problems which might happen because of the spread of illegal drug use.” Koh Santepheap, Vol.41, #6366, 9.6.2008

    Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
    Monday, 9 June 2008


    Chouy Khmer, Vol.2, #116, 9.6.2008

    • Police Took Editor-in-Chief of Moneaksekar Khmer, Mr. Dam Sith, to Prey Sar Prison on the Accusations of Defamation and Disinformation [8 June 2008 – for quoting what Mr. Sam Rainsy had said. – Even the Minister of Information is said in the Cambodia Daily to propose a release on bail]
    • [President of a nongovernmental border commission based in Paris] Sean Peng Se Criticizes the Government over the New Border Demarcation of Preah Vihear Temple Affecting Khmer Territory


    Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.7, #1662, 8-9.6.2008

    • Political Parties [and Civil Society Organizations] Support the Letter of the Great Heroic King [the former King Norodom Sihanouk, asking political parties to stop using the monarchy for election propaganda]


    Khmer Machas Srok, Vol.2, #172, 8-10.6.2008

    • Election Observers Request the Presence of Independent Organizations to Observe the Printing of Ballots
    • Civil Society Organizations Ask the Khmer Rouge Tribunal to Comment on the Serious Illness of [former Khmer Rouge leader] Khiev Samphan
    • Khieu Kanharith Rejects the Call [by the Cambodian League for the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights – LICADHO] for the Government to Reopen the Angkor Ratha Radio Station in Kratie


    Khmer Amatak, Vol.9, #589, 9.6.2008

    • Hun Sen Said if He Were Really Addicted to Drugs [as accused by opponents], He Would Order Soldiers and Tanks to Kill All Opposition [he said on 7 June 2008]


    Koh Santepheap, Vol.41, #6366, 9.6.2008

    • 139 Cambodian Troops Left to Fulfill Mine Clearing Duty in Sudan [8 June 2008]
    • Memorandum of Understanding between UNODC and the Ministry of Health on Drug Issues Follow-Up
    • A Surprise in Thailand: Father Chained His Daughter for More than Twenty Years [she is supposed to be mentally ill]


    Moneaksekar Khmer, Vol.15, #3481, 9.6.2008

    • It Is Time that the Government Should Release Rice Stocks of Nearly Two Million Tonnes to Be Sold for Citizens at a Cheap Price


    Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.16, #4610, 9.6.2008

    • [900 meters] Bridge Construction Connecting Koh Puos [island off Sihanoukville beach] Began Under an Investment Project of Euro 300 Million
    • [US based] International Republican Institute: Knowledge about the Khmer Rouge Tribunal Becomes More Widespread


    Samleng Yuvachun Khmer, Vol.15, #3328, 8-9.6.2008

    • National Authority for Solving Land Disputes Plans to Reclaim Illegally Taken Land of 300,000 Hectares during 2008
    • Phnom Penh Authority Remains Unable to Motivate CINTRI Company [garbage collecting] to Collect Garbage More Efficiently

    Have a look at last week’s editorial: Realizing that energy problems are not simply oil problems – so what shall we do?

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