Siam Recognized Its Mistake in the Fatal Shooting of a Khmer Citizen and Sent a Compensation of Baht 30,000 – Tuesday, 29.6.2010

Posted on 3 July 2010. Filed under: Week 671 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Mirror, Vol. 14, No. 671

“Battambang: The head of the Cambodian-Siamese Phnom Dei border crossing station in the Sampov Loun district, Mr. An Saray, told Koh Santepheap in the morning of 28 June 2010 that Siam [Thailand] recognized their wrongdoing over the fatal shooting on a Khmer citizen last week. He added that Siam sent a compensation of Baht 30,000 [approx. US$920] to the victim’s family after the body of the Khmer citizen had been sent back to Cambodia on 24 June 2010.

“It should remembered that one Khmer citizen in a group of four others was shot dead by Siamese [Thai] black-clad soldiers [from the special border protection units] on suspicion that the Khmer citizens tried to smuggle a motorbike illegally from Thailand to Cambodia. The Khmer citizen who was killed is Dim Doeu, 44. He lived in Trapaeng Prolet village, Santepheap commune, Sampov Loun district, Battambang. Three others who went with him managed to escape to Cambodia. The victim was suspected of illegally entering Siam and was shot at by Siamese soldiers at 6:40 p.m, on 23 June 2010 in Khao Chhorng Khet village, Klong Hat commune, Klong Hat district [all up to here phonetic], in the Sakaeo province of Siam, bordering Cambodia at the Ou L’hong village, Ta Sda commune, Sampov Loun, Battambang.

“Mr. An Saray said that even though Khmer citizens crossed the border illegally, Siam should not shoot to kill them, because it is against the agreement between both countries. He added that the agreement does not allow any side to use weapons or to arrest and torture citizens of any side who crosses the border illegally. Such a fatal shooting violates the agreement between the two countries. Mr. An Saray said that he had given the compensation from Siam to the victim’s family.” Koh Santepheap, Vol.43, #6994, 29.6.2010

Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
Tuesday, 29 June 2010

Deum Ampil, Vol.4, #516, 29.6.2010

  • [The president of the Cambodian People’s Party and of the Senate] Samdech Chea Sim: The Cambodian People’s Party Fully Supports Samdech Hun Sen as Prime Ministerial Candidate for a Long Term [he said so during the 59th anniversary of the creation of the Cambodian People’s Party]
  • Four People Were Arrested and Fake Money [fake US dollar notes] of More Than US$50,000 Was Seized [Phnom Penh]

Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.9, #2287, 29.6.2010

  • Cambodia Denied that a Chief Bombing Suspect in Thailand Entered Cambodia [the Bangkok Post published an article on 27 June 2010, accusing Cambodia of providing shelter to two persons who are considered to be the main instigators of the bomb explosions during the recent confrontations in Bangkok]
  • Traffic Accidents Kill, on Average Each Day, Four People [countrywide]

Koh Santepheap, Vol.43, #6994, 29.6.2010

  • Siam Recognized Its Mistake in the Fatal Shooting of a Khmer Citizen and Sent a Compensation of Baht 30,000

Moneaksekar Khmer, Vol.17, #3918, 29.6.2010

  • The Sam Rainsy Party Demanded the Fourteen Countries that Had Participated in the Paris Conference [1991] to Review the Agreements They Signed Related to the Territorial Integrity of Cambodia
  • After the Koh Kong Court Released Some Forestry Officials [but they are under observation], Wood Traders Being Detained also Hope to Find Ways to Get Out [through bribery]

Phnom Penh Post [Khmer Edition], Vol.1, #203, 29.6.2010

  • Citizens from the Anlong Veng District [Oddar Meanchey of more than 50 families] Ask for Intervention by the Prime Minister [they said that the location where they are required to relocate does not have adequate infrastructure; on 25 May 2010, the authorities burnt down houses of more than 100 families to evict them – claiming they are living in a National Park area]
  • The Authorities Continue to Eliminate Reservoirs around the Tonle Sap Lake [so far six reservoirs have been demolished because they affect bio-diversity and the eco-system of the Tonle Sap Lake region; there are 240 such reservoirs]

Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.18, #5236, 29.6.2010

  • The Government Announced to Add US$5 to the Salary of Garment Workers [so their minimum salary increases to US$61 per month; according to the Ministry of Labor]
  • Mr. Chea Mony Was Again Elected as Head of the Cambodian Free Trade Union of Workers without Competing Other Candidates

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The Law and the Environment of the Law – Sunday, 21.2.2010

Posted on 22 February 2010. Filed under: *Editorial*, Week 652 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Mirror, Vol. 14, No. 652

Very often, when some international media, or some voices in Cambodia deplore what is seen as violations of human rights or just other forms of suffering of some people when their living space – they land on which they lived and the small shelter they built on it – is taken away, the justification is often to say: But it is done according to the law!

While this is sometimes open for controversial interpretations, in other cases it may be perfectly true. But this still does not mean that those who are at the weaker end of the conflict do not suffer, whether they know the law or not.

But there are obviously also cases where it is surely quite difficult for the public to understand the complexity of some legislation – and if it is not easy to understand the rules, there is a lower motivation to follow them – though this is normally wrong not to follow the law.

During the municipal annual reflection meeting looking back at 2009, the Governor of Phnom Penh proudly mentioned that as part of clean-up operations in crime prone environments, also gambling was targeted – all together 1,152 gambling sites had been intercepted. – And in the same week we report that a new casino starts to operate: US$100 million have been invested to create 6,000 jobs.

Surely both elements of this report are based on some laws. Whether the difference is easy to understand or not, is a different question.

About the same meeting of the Phnom Penh municipality it is reported: “The firm position of the Phnom Penh Municipality in 2010 is not like that in 2009; it will not allow dishonest officials to keep on committing bad activities towards the people… previously, some officials used the opportunity of their positions to extort money from the people. But now, [Mr. Kep Chuktema, the Phnom Penh Governor,] warned, saying that officials doing such bad activities will no longer be tolerated.”

During last year the law was not kept by all, as the Governor says, but nothing happened – during this year, however, the law has to be kept. What is the difference? It is the same laws – so will those who did not keep it last year be convinced to now keep it? It is not reported that those, whose money had been extorted, did get it back, nor that whose, who had used the opportunity to misuse their positions for their personal gain were punished. What is changed?

The authorities set again a deadline for illegal pharmacies to apply for licenses – that about half of the more than 2,000 pharmacies operate without a licenses, is known, exposing the public to dangers.

There were also reports about special initiatives by the Prime Minister, either to clarify some gray areas related to the use and registration of cars, or, more seriously, that past and present violations of the law by military personal, which went so far unpunished, should stop.

Some time ago, the Prime Minister had ordered to remove RCAF license plates from private cars to avoid irregularities. A member of the National Assembly from an opposition party found out: “But recently, there appear again several cars using RCAF number plates, and such number plates are used even on some foreigners’ cars and on private trucks for [private] businesses; this can be considered as an illegitimate use of state cars for business, and driving for personal pleasure.” This impression cannot be avoided when one sees who is using some cars with RCAF license plates, and where, and when. But – says the Ministry of Defense – all is now legal. Where private cars are used with military license plates, they have been “contracted” to the state. Does this lead to clarity? Why would anybody contract one’s private care to the state? Why not the other way round: If a state owned vehicle is used also for private purposes, why is it not leased to the private user for an appropriate fee, with a private license plate?

That the new emphasis on the enforcement of the new traffic law is not only leading to a better compliance with the law, becomes clear from the following report – again by a parliamentarian of an opposition party (the much larger number of parliamentarians from the government party were not reported to take such personal initiatives to strengthen the rule of law): Traffic police established check points to extort money from citizens near the Chroy Changva bridge, where police stop and “check” cars and trucks to make them pay money without giving our receipts – keeping some money for themselves, and sharing some with their next higher level superiors.

And the new, strong statements against forest crimes? “The transport of luxury wood in the Thala Barivat district of Stung Treng continues without any disturbance by the authorities.”

The UN Special Rapporteur for Human Rights in Cambodia, Mr. Surya Prasad Subedi, reported after his second visit to the country on 26 January 2010, that he is encouraged from his positive meetings with Cambodian highest level political leader, as he saw especially progress in the strengthening of legal frameworks: “The Government has been receptive to some of the suggestions, including developing binding national guidelines on land evictions, making the law-making process more transparent by sharing draft legislation which has an impact on human rights issues with the wider community, and creating a Government and civil society forum in order to foster an environment of cooperation to strengthen democracy and human rights in the country.”

As so often in the past, it has to be repeated again and again: Not only the quality of laws, but their implementation is decisive.

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The First Meeting about the Implementation of the National Strategic Plan to Stop Violence against Women – Thursday, 18.2.2010

Posted on 19 February 2010. Filed under: Week 652 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Mirror, Vol. 14, No. 652

“Phnom Penh: The Open Institute, in collaboration with the Ministry of Women’s Affairs, held the first consultative meeting on the topic ‘Participating in the National Action Plan to Prevent Violence against Women, and the Importance of Using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to Combat Violence against Women.’

“Opening the meeting in the morning of 17 February 2010, a Secretary of State of the Ministry of Women’s Affairs, Ms. Sy Define, said that the meeting was the first one held by a government institution with a civil society organizations on this issue, and it was organized after the government had published the ‘National Action Plan about the Prevention of Violence against Women’ last year. She stressed that even without reference to specific figures, rape and violence against women appear in new ways, and all forms appear more frequently and more cruelly. This is a concern for the government as well as for non-government organizations.

“She added that a major challenge for the prevention of violence against women, which needs to be addressed immediately, is the victims’ fear and shame. She emphasized that the victims often try to hide what happened, and even as there are more rapes happening, there is also the increased tendency to hide them. This is because women feel ashamed and they are afraid of being treated with contempt by the society, and also the knowledge of citizens in many communities is limited, including the knowledge about the legal procedures to appeal to the courts which require the victims, mostly the poor, to pay money.

“Based on the above issues, Ms. Sy Define called for more publications of laws about rights and other measures that are important for preventing and reducing violence against women, where Information and Communication Technology (ICT) plays an important role.

“ICT provides a modern and fast way of communication using computers or mobile phones; it can reach us wherever we are, as far as the communications network extends. It provides easy and quick access to a collection of all kinds of information.

“Regarding this issue, the Executive Director of the Open Institute, Ms. Chim Manavy, said that this meeting is really important for reflecting about violence against women and the intersection between this problem and Information and Communication Technology. In many countries around the world, women’s networks and organizations use the Internet and communicate, using these technologies, to share their experiences and to gather resources and support for their activities, and organize for the creation of global strategic actions. She said that in Cambodia, however, most women have not developed the habit and the ability to use the Internet and to communicate through it to support their activities like it happens in other countries.

“She added, ‘Recently, there is more recognition of the intersection between violence against women and the instruments for electronic communication [with computers and mobile phones]. Violence against women and ICT have an impact on establishing fundamental freedoms and human rights.’

“But Ms. Manavy raised also other examples, saying, ‘While mobile phones and websites can benefit women who suffer violence, seeking information and assistance, some wicked persons use the same technology for exploitation, sending images violating women’s rights, which are human rights.’

“Relating to the negative use of ICT, Ms. Sy Define called on women to be aware of this problem and to join together to control it and to use ICT to combat such wrongdoings.

“She emphasized that the government alone cannot achieve the Millennium Development Goals for 2010, which state [as Goal 3] ‘Promote gender equality and empower women,’ without cooperation in many fields with non-government organizations and development partners to promote the capacity, knowledge, strength, and courage of women.

“She also asked all women’s and other institutions to join to encourage the use of ICT to help prevent violence against women as well as domestic violence, following the National Action Plan about the Prevention of Violence against Women.

“During the meeting held at the Hotel Cambodiana, participants from more than 40 institutions working on women and rights presented their results from separate observations about violence against women and domestic violence, and discussed to share their experiences, knowledge, lessons learned, other strategies, and the use of ICT to prevent violence against women and domestic violence.

“In the three hours meeting, participants offered recommendations and sought to identify key priorities for cooperation between civil society organizations and government institutions to develop joint strategies to effectively prevent violence against women, to encourage gender equality, and to empower women. Ten other organizations cooperated and attended the meeting: Cambodian Women for Peace and Development, the Cambodian Defenders’ Project, the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (NGO-CEDAW), the Project Against Domestic Violence, Legal Aid of Cambodia, the Cambodian Women’s Crisis Center, the Women’s Media Center, Positive Change for Cambodia, Pharmaciens Sans Frontières, and the Cambodian League for the Promotion and Defense of Human Rights (LICADHO).” Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.18, #5129, 18.2.2010

Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
Thursday, 18 February 2010

Deum Ampil, Vol.4, #413, 18.2.2010

  • Samdech Hun Sen: Cambodia Never Plants New Mines along the Border [he said so in response to some accusations, especially by Thailand]
  • The Phnom Penh Municipality Plans to Create Senior Citizens Associations Soon in the Eight Districts
  • Seventy One Journalists Were Killed in 2009 Worldwide [including 33 in the Philippines; according to the Committee to Protect Journalists]

Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.9, #2180, 18.2.2010

  • More Than 100 Cleaners at the Angkor Resort [of the Apsara Authority] Protested over the Late Payment of Their Salaries [Siem Reap]
  • The Khmer Rouge Tribunal Signed an Agreement to Create a Digital Tribunal [with the Stanford University and the Berkeley War Crimes Study Center of the University of California]
  • Report: America and Pakistan Arrested the Head of the [military wing of the] Taliban

Khmer Machas Srok, Vol.4, #605, 18.2.2010

  • A Casino of Oknha Ket Theang Worth US$100 Million Will Open Next Week [in Bavet, Svay Rieng, at the border to Vietnam – he said that his casino can offer jobs to about 6,000 Khmer citizens]

Moneaksekar Khmer, Vol.17, #3811, 18.2.2010

  • Avoiding to Respond to Sam Rainsy Party Parliamentarians’ Questions [over border issues] Shows the Irresponsibility of the Government

Phnom Penh Post [Khmer Edition], Vol.1, #114, 18.2.2010

  • Thirty One People Died in Traffic Accidents within the Three Days of the Chinese New Year [in Cambodia]

Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.18, #5129, 18.2.2010

  • The First Meeting about the Implementation of the National Strategic Plan to Stop Violence against Women
  • The Ministry of Public Works and Transport and the Ministry of Education Plan to Create a Navigation School to Improve Waterway Traffic Safety [this navigation school is for youth of the next generation to get training, based on proper educational standards to obtain a license. Before, the provision of shipping licenses depended on the testing and questioning previous experience of piloting ships or motor boats, but there was no training offered. Two or three years ago the Phnom Penh port started training for its personnel, but it was not open for the public]
  • The Transport of Luxury Wood in Thala Barivat District Continues without Any Disturbance [by the authorities – Stung Treng]

Sereypheap Thmey, Vol.18, #1876, 18.2.2010

  • [A Sam Rainsy parliamentarian] Mr. Son Chhay Asked [the Minister of Interior] Mr. Sar Kheng to Check Road Traffic Police Activities that Establish Illegal Check Points to Extort Money from Citizens [he raised a case near the Chroy Changva bridge where police stop cars or trucks to make them pay money unofficially which they keep for themselves or share some with their next higher level officials]

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In 2010, Officials Who Use Their Positions to Extort Money from the People Will Not Be Tolerated – Tuesday, 16.2.2010

Posted on 16 February 2010. Filed under: Week 652 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Mirror, Vol. 14, No. 652

“Phnom Penh: The firm position of the Phnom Penh Municipality in 2010 is not like that in 2009; it will not allow dishonest officials to keep on committing bad activities towards the people. This was declared by an official during the convention in the morning of 15 February 2010 to reflect on the work during 2009, and to determine the targets for 2010; the meeting was chaired by the Phnom Penh governor, Mr. Kep Chuktema.

“During this annual convention, Mr. Kep Chuktema advised all civil servants and all armed personnel to continue to be strictly honorable towards the people, so that they have confidence and trust in the services provided, though previously, some officials used the opportunity of their positions to extort money from the people. But now, he warned, saying that officials doing such bad activities will no longer be tolerated.

“The governor went on to say that only by obeying discipline and with heightened responsibility can the efficiency of the work and its results increase. He added, ‘Considering 2009, Phnom Penh can be proud for having cooperated well with each other, effectively deploying our forces to prevent and intercept crime, the activities of gangs, the illegal use of weapons, gambling, human and sex trafficking, and drug related crimes.’

“He continued to say that in 2010, what remains to be done is to focus more on such issues as public order, car parking facilities, traffic jam, illegal construction sites, and violations of the regulations regarding the use of pedestrian’s sidewalks. Also, he shared the information that Samdech Dekchor Hun Sen had ordered the Phnom Penh Municipality to create ties with the Intervention Brigade 9 of Division 3, stationed at the battlefield in the Preah Vihear area. ‘It is a new obligation for all of us to support the battlefield which is a great pride for the people in Phnom Penh.’

“During the convention, the Phnom Penh governor delivered a new car the Tuol Kork district command station, as a reward for its previous hard work.” Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.18, #5127, 16.2.2010

Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
Tuesday, 16 February 2010

Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.9, #2178, 16.2.2010

  • [The spokesperson of the Royal Government, the Minister of Information] Mr. Khieu Kanharith: Cambodia Welcomes the Thai Position [to solve the border disputes bilaterally], but He Questioned whether Thailand Is Willing to Do so or Not [recently Cambodia had suggested to settle the border issues internationally, but Thailand suggested to Cambodia to solve them bilaterally]

Koh Santepheap, Vol.43, #6885, 16.2.2010

  • An Outbreak of Diarrhea with Vomiting Caused 38 People to Be Hospitalized; One Villager Died, Leaving His Children Behind; Medics Call for More Sanitation [Kompong Chhnang – there is an ongoing public controversy: some experts say there is an outbreak of Cholera, which requires a different treatment from diarrhea – but the authorities maintained that it is not Cholera, and even if it were, the treatment is the same]
  • [Eighty eight] People Gathered at the Provincial Administration to Ask for the Removal of a Corrupt Village Chief [as he sold village land secretly for his own benefit – Kompong Speu]
  • Siam [Thailand] Sent Three Khmer Kampuchea Krom People to Cambodia from Detention in Bangkok [they failed to seek asylum in a third country]

Phnom Penh Post [Khmer Edition], Vol.1, #112, 16.2.2010

  • The President of the Human Rights Party [Mr. Kem Sokha] Calls for Unity [with other parties, to compete with the ruling Cambodian People’s Party]

Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.18, #5127, 16.2.2010

  • In 2010, Officials Who Use Their Positions to Extort Money from the People Will Not Be Tolerated
  • The Spokesperson of the Government Told Journalists to Be Careful when Translating Words [he reminded foreign journalists and foreign agencies in Cambodia to do so, otherwise the Prime Minister will appear to have done wrong and is then criticized for it; as an example, he said that the Cambodian Prime Minister challenged the Thai Prime Minister to ‘swear’ that he and his family should die if he claims that Thailand did not invade Cambodian territory, but some English newspaper incorrectly translated it as if he had ‘cursed’ the Thai Prime Minister]
  • Four Banks Provided Loans for an Electricity Plant Powered by Coal to be built in Sihanoukville [the OCBC Bank, the Maybank, the AmBank, and the Bank of China jointly offered US$140 million in loans to a Malaysian company, the Cambodia Energy Limited, to establish a 100 megawatt electricity plant]
  • Two Motorbikes Crashed into Each Other, Killing Two People and Seriously Injuring Three Others [Pursat]

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Saturday, 26.7.2008: Domestic Violence Still Increasing

Posted on 26 July 2008. Filed under: week 570 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Mirror, Vol. 12, No. 570

“Phnom Penh: Domestic violence remains a major issue in Khmer society – prevention and solutions are need immediately. Domestic violence becomes more cruel, serious, and alarming, especially during the first six months of 2008 this happened; and this trend has increased continually form year to year.

“Officials of different organizations working on domestic violence reported to Khmer Sthapana on 24 July 2008 that, during the period of the first six months of 2008, domestic violence increased alarmingly, and it is believed to be result of a decline of social morality, of inefficient education, and of the poor implementation of regulations.

“Recently, a son killed his father by using a sickle to cut his throat on 22 July 2008 in Khvet Thom, Prey Chhor, Kompong Cham. In another case, in Koh Roka Village, Koh Roka Commune, Peam Chor, Prey Veng, on 22 July 2008, a husband cut his wife’s throat with a cleaver making her bleeding all over the body because of an argument etc…

“According to a report by the Cambodian Human Rights and Development Association – ADHOC- domestic violence increased in 2007. In 2006, the organization received 532 case reports, but in 2007, there were 632 cases which led to 29 deaths. This increase is a signal of inefficient law enforcement, aiming at the prevention and the protection of victims from domestic violence.

“In 2007, there were 603 cases of domestic violence that led to injuries. Such violence causing injuries resulted from drunkenness, jealousy, from asserting power as the head of the family, having extra-marital relations, gambling, poverty, and the lack of education, sexual violence, etc…

“Looking at activities which lead to violence, offenders always find reasons to create arguments – after returning home from going to places of entertainment, or when they cannot get the money they ask for; they may start to destroy everything in their house, or use insults and rude words. After that, they hit the victims with sticks, sickles, cleavers, axes, or hoes, or by kicking. Sometimes, violence leads to disability or to death of their victims.

“This report continued to explain that because of strict traditions, some victims bear to live with offenders for years without any intervention by local authorities which might have led to solutions, until they lose their lives. Obviously, in 2007, deaths by domestic violence still increased, and this was not different from 2006.

“There were deaths because victims had been suffered many injuries. They had informed the local authorities to help to solve problems, but they get no response, because the authorities still consider domestic violence to be a domestic problem of a family, and they think they should not interfere to solve such problems.

“Also, it is often seen that the authorities are slow to intervene in domestic violence, and the keep things unattended unless somebody is injured or a victim is already dead before they go to investigate. This shows that regulations to stop domestic violence and to protect victims are not implemented efficiently.

“The authorities seem not to known the regulations that allow them to intervene and to prevent arguments in time at the initial stage, in order to avoid an escalation to domestic violence.

“It should be stressed that laws to stop domestic violence and to protect victims were approved by the National Assembly, and put into force on 24 October 2005. Though those laws became valid, they seem to be inefficient and not enforced at all, even though these laws allow the authorities, officials of the Ministry of Women’s Affairs, and neighbors of a victim to intervene at a site of dispute, to prevent domestic violence without asking for a warrant from the courts, and the authorities closest by have the duty to intervene immediately in cases of domestic violence happening to start, in order to protect the victim. The authorities do not use these laws to solve domestic violence. Generally, institutions involved use the new criminal procedures to deal with domestic violence, which is against Article 8 of the new code of criminal procedures.” Khmer Sthapana, Vol.1, #59, 26.7.2008

Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
Saturday, 26 July 2008


Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.7, #1703, 26.7.2008

  • Cambodia Needs Vietnam and Indonesia to Help Solve the Cambodia-Siam Dispute [according to Minister of Foreign Affairs Hor Namhong on 25 July 2008]
  • After a Protest, the Chhang Leang [garment] Factory Allowed Workers Free Time to Go Voting
  • The Number of Victims by Landmines and Unexploded Ordnance Declined to 170 Persons in Six Months [40 persons less than in the same period in 2007]
  • Malaria Declined by 50% Early This Year [compared to 2007, 15,500 people had malaria, and 46 people died]
  • A Thai Pro-Government Group Attacked an Anti-Government Group, Injuring 20 People [according to Associated Press on 25 July 2008]


Khmer Amatak, Vol.9, #5, 26-27.7.2008

  • [Prime Minister] Hun Sen Is Showing Nationalism [regarding the Preah Vihear Temple Issue] to Attract Voters


Khmer Sthapana, Vol.1, #59, 26.7.2008

  • Domestic Violence Still Increasing
  • Hor Namhong Hopes that Foreign Affairs Ministerial Meeting [with Thailand] Will Come to Solutions


Koh Santepheap, Vol.41, #6407, 26-27.7.2008

  • Civil Society Organizations that Observe the Election Process Declared that Election Campaigning This Year Was Better than Before [25 July 2008]
  • China Cracked Down a Terrorist Group [in Shanghai] That Had Planned to Attack the Olympic Events [24 July 2008]


Moneaksekar Khmer, Vol.15, #3522, 26.7.2008

  • Police Just Drew a Sketch of the Faces of the Criminals Who Shot Dead Mr. Khim Sambo, a Moneaksekar Khmer Journalist and His Son [age 21]
  • The Neutral and Impartial Committee for Free and Fair Elections in Cambodia Criticized the Lack of Neutrality, because the Armed Forces Participated to Support the Ruling Party [said Mr. Hang Puthea, Executive Director of the Neutral and Impartial Committee for Free and Fair Elections in Cambodia; when observers appeared near locations where there was a distributions of gifts and money to voters, the observers always saw also police, causing concern]


Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.16, #4651, 26.7.2008

  • Election Campaign Finished without Violence
  • Police Found 6-Year-Old Swedish Girl Abducted [by her father] to Cambodia [in Pursat]

Click here – and have a look at the last editorial – The Cambodian-Thai border crisis develops while the Khmer public is not aware what the Cambodian government representatives had agreed upon, to get the Preah Vihear Temple listed as a World Heritage Site, on a most narrowly defined piece of land.

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