Archive for October 20th, 2009

China Provides Colossal Aid to Develop Cambodian Infrastructure – Monday, 19.10.2009

Posted on 20 October 2009. Filed under: Week 635 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Mirror, Vol. 13, No. 635

“Phnom Penh: The Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Deputy Prime Minister Hor Namhong, said that the government of the People’s Republic of China decided to provide more aid and loans for infrastructure development in Cambodia during the visit of Prime Minister Samdech Hun Sen to Sichuan to attend the inauguration of the 10th Western China International Economy and Trade Fair – 中国西部国际博览会.

“The Deputy Prime Minister said so during a press conference in the morning of 17 October 2009 at the Phnom Penh International Airport after the Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Cambodia, Samdech Akkak Moha Senapadei Dekchor Hun Sen, had returned from China.

“The Deputy Prime Minister stated that during the visit, the secretary of the communist party of China in the Province of Sichuan provided the Prime Minister 50 motor pumps, 30 tractors, and 30 agricultural trucks. Also, the Province of Sichuan offers scholarships for students and for civil servants to receive training there. Besides this, Samdech Dekchor Hun Sen officially negotiated with the Chinese Prime Minister, and he has achieved many results for the country including US$260 million in loans in response to a Cambodian requests to China from 2008, for 5 projects:

  1. Construction of 2 roads – National Road 62 from Kompong Thom to Tbaeng Meanchey in Preah Vihear and National Road 8 from Anlong Chrey to Meun Chey in Prey Veng;
  2. Construction of a irrigation system in Battambang;
  3. Construction of National Road 76 from Sen Monorum to Dac Dam in Mondolkiri;
  4. Creation of a flood controlling system in Kompong Trabaek district in Prey Veng; and
  5. Construction of electricity supply nets around Phnom Penh for poor people.

“Among the US$260 million in loans for 5 projects, Prime Minister Samdech Hun Sen asked China to use the remaining US$30 million to build the second Chroy Chongva bridge [in Phnom Penh] to help reduce traffic congestion.

“Deputy Prime Minister Hor Namhong added that in 2009, Cambodia requested China in two phases for support of 11 projects worth US$593 million in total. In the fist phase, there are US$297 million for 5 projects:

  1. Construction of a road of 179 km from Thma Koul district in Battambang to the Thai border worth US$95 million,
  2. Construction of roads along the Cambodian-Thai border from Pailin to Koun Damrei worth US$73 million;
  3. Improvement of National Road 6 by creating 4 roads of 40 km worth US$57 million;
  4. Enlargement of the Phnom Penh Port worth US$30 million; and
  5. Water resources development at the Steung Keo river in Kampot worth US$42 million.

“The second phase worth US$296 million consists of 6 projects:

  1. Construction of the Takhmao Bridge and 21 km railroad worth US$42 million;
  2. Construction of Road 42 of 91 km from the Thnol Toteung to Chum Kiri district in Kampot worth US$48 million;
  3. Improvement of National Road 5 from Phnom Penh to Prek Kdam to have two lanes for going and two lanes for returning worth US$36 million;
  4. Construction of a dam at the Pursat river worth US$60 million;
  5. Construction of electricity networks in rural areas wroth US$50 million; and
  6. Construction of a hydro-electric dam in the north worth US$55 million.

“Mr. Hor Namhong stressed that both in 2008 and 2009, Cambodia receives nearly US$1 billion in loans from China for infrastructure development, such as roads, bridges, and dams, which is the second sector supporting economic development and promoting livelihood of citizens [the first being agriculture]. Besides these loans, Chinese Prime Minister granted Yuan 100 million [approx. US$15 million] to Cambodia, where Yuan 50 million is grant aid, and another Yuan 50 million is loans with no interest, and Prime Minister Samdech Hun Sen will use this money to help citizens suffering from floods and to restore infrastructure.

“During his visit at China, Prime Minister Samdech Hun Sen met also the Sri Lankan and Vietnamese prime ministers.”
Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.8, #2075, 18-19.10.2009

.

Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
Monday, 19 October 2009

Deum Ampil, Vol.3, #314, 18-19.10.2009

  • High Ranking Cambodian Army Officers Visited the Border [to boost morale and check the military situation]
  • A Court Jailed [an official of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport,] Nhem Vandoeun at the PJ Prison [which is said to have better living conditions compared to other prisons], but Did Not Send Him to Prey Sar Prison [for – corruption related to the issuing of number plates for vehicles]
  • [Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation] Mr. Hor Namhong: I Have No Fear, though [the president of the Sam Rainsy Party] Mr. Sam Rainsy Is Collecting More Evidence [over the defamation appeal of Mr. Sam Rainsy]

Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.8, #2075, 18-19.10.2009

  • China Provides Colossal Aid to Develop Cambodian Infrastructure
  • One Institution Has Two Offices in Poipet [there are two Cambodia-Thai Border Coordination Offices controlled by two different generals]

Khmer Amatak, Vol.10, #662, 19.10.2009

  • The Court Singled Out Two Accusations against [the head of the Phnom Penh Municipal Police anti-drug-trafficking office ] Touch Muysor [for bribing and for illegally possessing about 8,000 methamphetamine pills at about US$100,000] and Detained Him Temporarily at the Prey Sar Prison [Phnom Penh]

Khmer Machas Srok, Vol.3, #512, 18-20.10.2009

  • The World Bank and Japan Want to Help Restore Infrastructure Damaged by Typhoon Ketsana, but Need that Cambodia Deliver an Accurate Report

Koh Santepheap, Vol.42, #6782, 19.10.2009

  • The United Arab Emirates Promised to Offer Tourism Scholarships, to Create an Agreement Encouraging Direct Flights to Cambodia, and to Help Develop Human Resources [in tourism]

Phnom Penh Post, Vol.1, #28, 19.10.2009

  • The European Union Said that Cambodia [through Cambodia Angkor Air, created by a joint investment by Cambodia and Vietnam] Has Only the Right to Book Tickets [to Vietnam, to its partner airline, as Cambodia Angkor Air is at present not yet recognized by the International Civil Aviation Organization – ICAO]
  • [Nearly 2,000] Workers of the Tac Fat Factory Who Had Been Protesting, Knelt Down at the Prime Minister’s Car Procession [when he returned from China, to ask for his intervention related to the factory closing]

Rasmei Angkor, Vol.16, #1470, 19.10.2009

  • A Saleswoman Was Stabbed to Death by a Robber in Her House [the perpetrator escaped – Kandal]

Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.17, #5024, 18-19.10.2009

  • [Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation] Mr. Hor Namhong: The Cambodian Prime Minister Might Raise the Border Dispute [around Preah Vihear] at the ASEAN Meeting
  • The Maldives Held a Cabinet Meeting under Water [calling for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions ahead of a UN climate change conference in December 2009, because the country is only 2 m above the sea level and will be under water in 60 or 70 years if global warming continues like now]

Sereypheap Thmey, Vol.17, #1810, 19.10.2009

  • Mr. Sam Rainsy Expects to Receive New Evidence to Present to the [French] Court to Question [Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation] Mr. Hor Namhong [relating to his role in the Boeung Trabaek Camp for returning intellectuals during the Khmer Rouge time]

.

Have a look at the last editorial – you can access it directly from the main page of the Mirror.
And please recommend us also to your colleagues and friends.

Back to top

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Knowing – Using – or Disregarding the Law – Sunday, 18.10.2009

Posted on 20 October 2009. Filed under: *Editorial*, Week 634 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Mirror, Vol. 13, No. 634

Discussions about the law, or actions without much awareness or even disregard for the law, are reaching the media regularly, sometimes in increasing numbers – just like now. This reflects, of course, also a general awareness in certain sections of the public.

Whoever mentions the Constitution of the Kingdom of Cambodia is mostly happy about it, and since the introduction of the Senate into to political structures of the country, there was hardly any suggestion that the Constitution should be changed – though there have been repeated pleas that its implementation should be improved. Though one member of the National Assembly is reported to have said recently he regrets that the death penalty is excluded by the Constitution – an opinion quite contrary to international developments during the last decade.

But that does not mean that it is always clear how certain basic statements in the Constitution are to be translated into practice. The conflicts between different mobile phone service providers, going on since a couple of weeks already, have shown this.

The Constitution simply says in Articles 56, 57, and 63:

  • “The Kingdom of Cambodia shall adopt the market economy system.
  • The preparation and process of this economic system shall be determined by the law.
  • Tax collection shall be in accordance with the law…
  • The State shall respect market management in order to guarantee a better standard of living for the people.”

But had it been “determined by law” what, for example, as we mirrored on 15 October 2009, that “Road Tax Checking for 2009 Will Begin on 16 October 2009 Countrywide.” Why only now in October, one might ask – does this boost tax income, or did it delay payments to the state by those who have enough resources to own motorized vehicles?

The charges and payment methods of several old and new mobile phone providers – all supposedly operating according to a market economy system – led not only to confrontative discussions among them, but also to a disruption of certain services: some systems were said to not have forwarded calls to some other systems – the users, the consumers, suffered from these conflicts, so that finally appeals to the government were made to find solutions.

What had happened? Some newer companies had started to offer new fee and payment systems, including free calls between users of the same system, but charging for calls to others networks. Competitive pricing seemed for those who offered it within the market economy system, as in many other countries – where it is left to the market to see which company survives with the response they get from their customers.

The Constitution, concerned with the most favorable results for the end consumer, seems to support this also:

  • “The State shall respect market management in order to guarantee a better standard of living for the people.”

Cheaper communication costs seem to fulfill this goal.

It is always a good practice so look at innovative approaches in other countries – not necessarily to follow everything, but to seriously consider solutions others found in their context:

Earlier this year, the Tata corporation of India, dealing with cars, telecommunications, and steel, is setting up with the Japanese DOCOMO company, a new cellular service in the Indian market, where there are already more than 350 million customers. So Tata DOCOMO had to find ways to compete. All very similar to Cambodia – but on a much smaller scale. Tata DOCOMO used special lower cost pricing – charging per second where others charge per minute, charging SMS by the number of of letters sent, and not per message.

But it seems that decisions have been taken in Cambodia not to allow a “free market management,” by not allowing some companies to offer their customers free services. And even a special private company will be introduced to do the work which in many other countries is one of the tasks of the regulators, not of another private company – doing public coordination – which was not formed as a not-for-profit, and not by public bidding.

Not according to existing laws, but by administrative intervention, a market problem is being solved.

During the week, another crucial problem of acting within and according to the framework of the law was raised: Who knows what the law says – how is this made know? Known to the citizens what rights they have, and know to the law enforcement agents throughout the country – the police and the courts – which rights of the citizens they have to protect.

We repeat some observations from Saturday, 19.10.2009 – more details and the source is there:

Civil Society Wants to See that the Government Publishes the Contents of Law as Broadly as It Does at the National Assembly

“Though Article 13 of the Law on the Organization and Functioning of the Council of Ministers (1994) provides that “all norms and standards with general effect must be published in the Official Gazette,” the publication of Cambodian laws is intermittent, incomplete and poorly distributed…

“On the basis of the Cambodian specific experience … there is an argument that the publication and distribution of law in electronic form is an appropriate tool to address the question of access to information in a legal system which has operated without adequate access to even the most basic legal information.

“Though there are issues to consider with regard to the development of a legal information system which will work in the Cambodian context, the country would appear to be at a juncture whereby there is sufficient political will to commence a dialogue with government, academia and civil society with a view to developing a model for the sustainable provision of legal information via the internet. Ideally, any movements in this direction would be accompanied by a regulation requiring all institutions of state to provide certain identified classes of documents for free electronic distribution…”

But there are different opinions about the sequence in which new legislation is needed in society: “The Cambodian Free Trade Union of Workers Said that an Anti-Corruption Law Should Be Created before a Demonstration Law.” Why this sequence? “Because if corruption can be prevented, workers and citizens in general will not demonstrate or strike.”

Of course there are also those who just don’t seem to care, as long as the law enforcement leadership of the country does not care either, as we had mirrored:

“Koh Kong, Kompong Thom, and Prey Veng Governors Do not Care about Prime Minister Hun Sen’s Order to Crack Down On Gambling”

.

Please recommend us also to your colleagues and friends.

Back to top

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...