Tuesday, 23.9.2008: To Stamp Out Human Trafficking It Has to Be Done in Wide Cooperation

Posted on 24 September 2008. Filed under: Week 579 |

The Mirror, Vol. 12, No. 579

“Phnom Penh: Some human trafficking inside of the country and internationally always happens and changes into different forms. However, human trafficking could be stamped out in Cambodia efficiently, if all relevant sectors and sides are involved, and it has to be done in a wide cooperation.

“At a national conferences about stamping out human trafficking in Cambodia, held on 15 and 16 September 2008 at the Hotel Cambodiana, H.E. Ho Non, chairperson of the Commission on Public Health, Social Welfare and Labor, and Women’s and Veteran’s Affairs , stated that human trafficking, particularly of women and children, remains a complicated issue to which the Royal Government and the National Assembly have to put further efforts to solve it.

“H.E. Ho Non added that human trafficking occurs in Cambodia in different forms, and there are various causes, such as war, poverty, illiteracy, unemployment, modernization, and poor social morality . As for the elimination of human trafficking, it cannot be solved by one institution alone, but it has to be attacked by all relevant sectors and sides, and it has to be implemented in cooperation.

“H.E. Mu Sochua, the Sam Rainsy Party deputy secretary general and former Minister of Women’s Affairs, said that efficiency does not depend on the existence of laws, but on the respect and enforcement of laws.

“Mr. Sok Sam Oeun, the Director of the Cambodian Defenders Project, said that if we want to prevent human trafficking efficiently, there have to be reforms, such as the strengthening of procedures and of the competency of the police, and law enforcement officials must be neutral and must not have a bias towards any party.

“Mr. Sok Sam Oeun emphasized that laws against human trafficking have been well developed, but efforts to stamp out human trafficking are not yet sufficient.

“H.E. Mu Sochua, the Minister of Women’s Affairs between 1994 and 2004, continued, ‘If there is no court reform, and police and law enforcement officials do not place law enforcement as their top priority and are corrupt, there can be no improvement. Also, the government has to help to find solutions by engaging in socio-economic development, and law enforcement officials have to be independent.

“Nevertheless, H.E. Ho Non said that the Royal Government, led wisely by Samdech Dekchor Hun Sen, always focuses on human trafficking, and it has created a [national anti-trafficking] task force to lead the fight against trafficking against the exploitation of human labor, and against sex exploitation on women and children, while the relevant ministries have publicized and implemented laws to bring perpetrators of human trafficking to be convicted.

“According to a report of the [Cambodian] Ministry of Interior published in the Trafficking in Persons Report 2008 of the US Department of State on June 2008, 65 human trafficking perpetrators were arrested and 52 were prosecuted by courts between April 2007 and March 2008. 188 [?] women were victimized by human trafficking [???].” Amnach Reas, Vol.1, #23, 22-28.9.2008

Note:

From the Cambodia section of the Trafficking in Persons Report 2008 (starting at page 31):

“Due to resource constraints, the government has not provided reliable statistics on prosecution. The Ministry of Interior (MOI) reported receiving complaints of 53 trafficking cases from April 2007 to March 2008; thirty-five cases were sex trafficking involving 60 victims and 11 were labor trafficking cases involving 106 victims. Police took action on 43 cases. The MOI reported that 65 traffickers were arrested during the reporting period. The Phnom Penh Municipal Court convicted 52 trafficking offenders. The MOI Department of Anti-Trafficking and Juvenile Protection reported 52 cases, involving 65 trafficking offenders that resulted in eight convictions. NGOs reported 19 labor trafficking cases involving legal migrants who ended up in conditions of involuntary servitude in Malaysia, but Cambodian labor recruitment companies usually paid compensation and were not prosecuted for criminal offenses. There were no cases of labor agents being held responsible for the trafficking of migrant workers, or being prosecuted. In February 2008, Prime Minister Hun Sen ordered the Ministry of Commerce to annul business licenses for marriage agencies, calling the business a form of human trafficking.

Corruption is pervasive in Cambodia, and it is widely believed that some individuals, including police and judicial officials, are involved in trafficking. In an important move that sent a signal that corruption will not be tolerated by senior government officials, an investigation into the Chhay Hour II brothel case resulted in the removal of the President of the Appeals Court for trafficking related corruption. The same investigation resulted in three other judges and one deputy prosecutor of the Appeals Court receiving official letters of reprimand. The MOI Anti-Human Trafficking Juvenile Protection Department Director administratively transferred two police officers who were convicted and sentenced to seven years in prison in 2006 by the Phnom Penh Municipal Court for trafficking related corruption. While these anti-corruption efforts are laudable, officials involved in trafficking must ultimately be punished with jail time, not merely administrative penalties.” (from pages 32 and 33)

Newspapers Appearing on the Newsstand:
Tuesday, 23 September 2008

Amnach Reas, Vol.1, #23, 22-28.9.2008

  • To Stamp Out Human Trafficking It Has to Be Done in Wide Cooperation
  • Sex Work Is Hidden Mostly Under the Cover of Massage Houses and Hotels

Chakraval, Vol.16, #2813, 23.9.2008

  • Newly Nominated Siamese [Thai] Prime Minister Made a Phone Call to Samdech Dekchor Hun Sen and Plans to Visit Cambodia [according to government spokesperson Minister Khieu Kanharith]


Kampuchea Thmey, Vol.7, #1753, 23.9.2008

  • Nearly 12,900 Children in China Got Sick because of Milk Powder [contaminated with toxic chemicals]


Koh Santepheap, Vol.41, #6457, 23.9.2008

  • Bilateral Negotiations [with Thailand] Will Start Again; Samdech Dekchor Hun Sen and Deputy Prime Minister [Hor Namhong] Will Leave for the United Nations [General Assembly this week, and negotiations will be held there]
  • From Among the More Than 50,000 Students, Who Earned a High School Diploma Certificate This Year, the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports Selects 3,260 Students for Scholarships in 2008


Moneaksekar Khmer, Vol.15, #3572, 23.9.2008

  • The Sam Rainsy Party Does Not Change Its Position to Wait for a Response from the King [for a separate swearing-in]
  • The Opposition Parties [the Sam Rainsy Party and the Human Rights Party] Will Hold a Separate Swearing-in at Night on 25 September 2008 [according Sam Rainsy Party parliamentarian Mr. Son Chhay]
  • [Minister of Economy and Finance] Keat Chhon Is Competent to Decrease the Price of Fuel by Riel 100 [approx. US$0.025] per Liter Only


Rasmei Kampuchea, Vol.16, #4701, 23.9.2008

  • Five-Times Flights by the Siamese [Thai] Air Force Violated Cambodian Air Space in the Thma Doun Area at the Ta Krabei Temple [Oddar Meanchey]
  • A Lieutenant General and Seventeen Other People Were Arrested over a Fraudulent Authorization Letter [faked to appear to come from the Prime Minister] to Sell the Renakse Hotel [Phnom Penh]
  • The United States Recognizes that there Is Freedom of Religion in Cambodia [according to the International Religious Freedom report of the US Department State on 19 September 2008: – “The Constitution provides for freedom of religion, and other laws and policies contributed to the generally free practice of religion. Buddhism is the state religion. The Government generally respected religious freedom in practice. There was no change in the status of religious freedom by the Government during the period covered by this report. There were few reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious affiliation, belief, or practice.”]
    The Cambodia section is here
  • Concerns over Hygiene for People Living at the Tonle Sap Lake [because of human waste discharge and disposal of garbage into the same water used for domestic consumption]
  • Vietnam Ranks Second in Southeast Asian for Fake Medicines [after Laos]
  • Flood and Rain in India Have Killed 173 People

Click here to have a look at the last editorial – the public depends on reliable information

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One Response to “Tuesday, 23.9.2008: To Stamp Out Human Trafficking It Has to Be Done in Wide Cooperation”

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Portland, Oregon – Big Shot Pictures has completed a pro-bono video production project for Transitions Global about building new lives for the young survivors of Cambodia’s prolific sex trafficking industry. The nine-minute mini-documentary was produced to generate awareness and raise funds to help the children Transitions Global has rescued from the nightmare of sexual enslavement. Transitions Global’s goal is to create sustainable futures for these 14-15 year old girls who have been taken from their families, threatened and beaten.

Comprised of interviews with James Pond, the organization’s executive director and founder, Jaya Sry, Cambodian director and trauma specialist Dr. Wendy Freed, plus footage from NBC’s Dateline, the project was the brainchild of Big Shot Picture’s Erin McNamara who coordinated all phases of production development and supervised pre-production, production and post-production.

“We appreciate Big Shot Picture’s commitment to the global community and the dedication Ms. McNamara has given to this project,” said Mr. Pond. “Our hope is to leverage this powerful piece to raise much needed funds and generate awareness for the young who are suffering.”

Formerly known as Transitions Cambodia, the Pond family changed the name of the organization to Transitions Global, to reflect the many hot spots around the globe where child sex trafficking is prolific. Acknowledged for their 70% rehabilitation rate, Transitions Global has an ongoing need for donations to help expand their resources and help teens develop much needed life skills.

For more information about donating to Transitions Global, visit http://www.transitionsglobal.org.

Big Shot Pictures is a multi-disciplined film and video production company offering traditional advertising, film and television content, DRTV, and corporate film and video. For more information, visit http://www.bigshotpictures.com.


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